PatchWork + Destructor + Late Replies – The Ultimate Guitar Combo?

Did you know that as a guitarist, with Blue Cat’s PatchWork as a host application (or plug-in), Blue Cat’s Destructor for the guitar tone and Late Replies for the ambiance and creative effects, you have access to an incredible palette of sounds for your studio work or live gigs? Here are a few examples, using mainly factory presets… Enjoy!

Auto Backing Track

Just play the lead part, Blue Cat’s Late Replies will follow you and produce a backing track that fits your playing!

Looper

With Late Replies as a rhythmic pattern generator and looper at the same time, you can play both rhythm and lead parts a in a single take. Destructor loaded with “15 Crunch Comp” factory preset.

Clean Reverb

A clean guitar tone, with long reverb… What else?

Clean Pattern Delays

With clean tones, use pattern-based delays for rhythmic inspiration.

Guitar Swell and Harmonized Reverb

Violin-style auto swell with the built-in gate module of Blue Cat’s Destructor on a lead tone – the reverb is shifted by a fifth:

You can also do it manually with the volume pot of your guitar…

Playing with Harmony

Late Replies includes a pitch shifter – play with delays in harmony!

And Much More…

Do you actually need to know how to play the guitar? 🙂

Want more guitar videos? Check out our guitar videos playlist on YouTube!

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Late Replies – Managing Delay Time & Working With The Grid

Blue Cat’s Late Replies offers a flexible approach to manage the delay time across its multi-tap section and feedback loops.

In this video Eli Krantzberg explains the base delay settings, and tells you how to use (or not to use) the grid and random functions to create in or out-of-sync delays. You will also learn how to link the taps and feedback loops together to quickly edit them all at once.

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Blue Cat’s Late Replies Creative Delay Walkthrough Video

Got your copy of Blue Cat’s Late Replies? Not sure how to get started? Haven’t tried the plug-in yet and wondering why you would need yet another delay plug-in?

Don’t worry: here is a video that walks you through the main features of our creative delay and multi fx plug-in, with full details and concrete examples. Watch out! This may change forever what you think about a delay plug-in can do for you!

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Destructor In the Studio – Part 1

We are glad to unleash the first episode of a video series about Blue Cat’s Destructor in the studio: Eli Krantzberg will show you how he uses Destructor to record and mix guitar parts for a TV underscore cue he is working on.

Guitar connected straight into the box, the chase for the perfect guitar tone can begin! As you will see, it is as simple as picking up a few presets and tweaking them to your taste.

In today’s episode, Eli is exploring a few clean guitar tones to record rhythm parts, check it out!

Next week, we’ll add some more dirt to it! Keep connected!

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Guitar Tone Matching With Blue Cat’s Destructor – EVH

There are many ways to match the tone of your favorite guitar players with your own gear.

Here is Hans Van Even‘s method, using Blue Cat’s Destructor to mimic Eddie Van Halen’s famous guitar tone, also known as the “brown sound”. Watch out! Sick guitar shredding inside!

Update: Hans’ EVH preset for Blue Cat’s Destructor (compatible with all plug-ins formats) and the Cubase session of the tutorial are now available for download. Check them out!

Enjoy!

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Transfering Blue Cat Audio Plug-Ins to a New Windows PC

If you are using multiple machines or if you want to transfer your plug-ins quickly to a new PC without having to register your all your Blue Cat Audio plug-ins again and setup your preferences, here is the solution.

Note: this transfer step should be done BEFORE installing the plug-ins using the installers downloaded from your private download page.

On Windows, Blue Cat Audio plug-ins preferences and license files are stored in the Application Data roaming folder located in the user directory. This folder a hidden and usually cannot be opened from the Explorer directly. You can however access it by typing its path in the Explorer:

type your actual user name instead of [YOUR USERNAME]

You will find a Blue Cat Audio folder in this directory. It contains all preferences and license files for all Blue Cat Audio plug-ins:

To transfer all licenses and preferences to your new machine, simply copy and paste the Blue Cat Audio folder from the source machine to the destination one (in the user AppData/Roaming directory).

“Voilà”! Just install the plug-ins on the new machine and use them without having to register them individually!

Note: If you want  to select just a few plug-ins, you can copy and paste each plug-in directory, one by one. In this case, you will notice that preferences are stored separately for each plug-in format (VST, AAX, RTAS or AU) in a directory named “BC [PLUGIN NAME] [PLUGIN FORMAT]”, while (for most plug-ins) a single license file (.lic) is shared by all formats in a directory named Blue Cat’s [PLUGIN NAME].

This tutorial also applies to multiple users on a single machine: you can transfer preferences and licenses to a different username on the same machine by moving the same files.

Using a Mac? Check out this plug-in transfer tutorial instead!